LaTeX/Thesis

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Using the class defined by uwthesis.cls will take care of most of the formatting required by the Graduate School as defined in their [http://www.grad.washington.edu/stsv/stylman/policy_style.pdf Policy and Style Manual for Theses and Dissertations]
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Using the class defined by uwthesis.cls will take care of most of the formatting required by the Graduate School as defined in their [http://www.grad.washington.edu/students/etd/req-sections.shtml requirements] (which have gotten a lot less onerous over the years!)
  
 
The uwthesis.cls file is included in some LaTeX distributions or can be downloaded from the author's website:
 
The uwthesis.cls file is included in some LaTeX distributions or can be downloaded from the author's website:
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That site also provides the example file uwthesis.tex, which is a good starting place for one's own thesis or dissertation.
 
That site also provides the example file uwthesis.tex, which is a good starting place for one's own thesis or dissertation.
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==Multiple files==
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It's recommended that you write each chapter as a separate file if you're going the tex route, and this guide to [http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LaTeX/Modular_Documents modular documents] lays out several options.
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==Bibliography==
 
==Bibliography==

Latest revision as of 23:37, 7 November 2014

Using the class defined by uwthesis.cls will take care of most of the formatting required by the Graduate School as defined in their requirements (which have gotten a lot less onerous over the years!)

The uwthesis.cls file is included in some LaTeX distributions or can be downloaded from the author's website: http://staff.washington.edu/fox/tex/thesis.shtml

That site also provides the example file uwthesis.tex, which is a good starting place for one's own thesis or dissertation.


Multiple files

It's recommended that you write each chapter as a separate file if you're going the tex route, and this guide to modular documents lays out several options.


Bibliography

Many QERMies have used the natbib package, which is usually included with the LaTeX installation and facilitates citations like these:

\citet{jon90} -->  Jones et al. (1990)
\citep{jon90} -->  (Jones et al., 1990)

Also the grad school is flexible with regard to formatting of the bibliography. A list of bibliography style files associated with various biological journals can be found here: http://www.physics.ucsd.edu/~crs/physics/computing/latex/BioLatex.html

In some cases (at least in one case), the use of natbib and most bibliography style files (.bst) resulted in a double spaced bibliography when the Grad School requires single spaced entries (with double spacing in between). This can be corrected by manually changing the line spacing before and after the calls to the bibliography within the .tex file for the thesis like this:

\def\baselinestretch{1.0}\normalfont 
\bibliographystyle{ecology}
\bibliography{ianphd}
\def\baselinestretch{1.5}\normalfont
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